Hydroponic Weed Seeds

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Starting your seeds hydroponically has many benefits, but many people are unsure how to go about it. Since hydroponics systems aren't as forgiving as soil, it’s best to start with cannabis strains that have solid genetics. How to grow cannabis seeds hydroponically is a promising solution to many challenges of cannabis crop production. Buy Feminized Seeds.

Hydroponic Seed Starting 101: A Primer for Beginners

Starting your seeds hydroponically has many benefits, but many people are unsure how to go about it. Shannon McKee gives us a primer on the basics of starting your own seeds to expand on what you’re currently growing.

Many people skip starting their own seeds because of the time and effort to get them started, but there are some great reasons to start your own seeds hydroponically. It’s so much easier to just go to the store to pick up some seedlings to pop into your system and get growing, right? Well, store-bought seedlings do have some downsides that can be avoided if you start your own.

The first is that you’re limited to what you can grow in your system. You have to choose from the options available at the store. However, if you start your own seeds, you can grow anything. This means you can grow your favorite heirlooms or even rare plants that aren’t found at many nurseries.

Adding seeds to your hydroponic system means that they won’t go through any trauma or root damage from being transplanted into your system. This process may also introduce diseases or bugs into your hydroponic system from the store.

Also, you get the satisfaction of growing a plant from a tiny seed rather than just picking up a seedling. Plus, a packet of seeds can grow a number of plants for just a few bucks, whereas the cost of only one seedling can be the same amount.

Seeds are also more cost-effective than buying one or two seedlings in the long run, as you can save some for the following year. The germination rate can decrease over time, but often, you can still get quite a few to sprout over the years until you have to buy your next seed packet.

What You Need to Start Seeds in a Hydroponic System

The first time you start your own seeds for your hydroponic system may be a bit more expensive at the beginning because you need to buy more materials than in future years. Seeds need water, light, oxygen, and heat to grow. You really don’t need anything too special to grow your own seeds.

You can use a grow tray with a dome for your own miniature greenhouse to create an ideal environment. If you’ll be growing your seeds in an area that is cooler, you may want to invest in a heating mat that goes underneath the grow tray to keep it warm as this is a necessary condition for sprouting to occur. Light is good to have as well as this will help your seeds sprout.

Inside of your grow tray, it can be beneficial to use a pot that works for your seeds and their future as seedlings in your hydroponic set-up. You’ll want to use starter cubes, such as those made of stonewool (rockwool). The key here is to use something that can withstand being immersed in water without dissolving, as it could clog up your system after transplanting.

Step by Step Instructions for Sprouting Seeds in a Hydroponic System

  • The first thing that you’ll want to do is to soak your starter cubes in clean water for about an hour. After they’ve been given a chance to soak, put a few seeds into the cube’s hole. You’ll want to add several just in case you have some seeds that don’t germinate. Once they sprout, you can thin out the weaker plants to allow the strongest to grow.
  • Prepare your grow tray with about an inch of clean water or nutrient solution that is at half strength. Arrange the light source and heating mat as needed. You can keep the lid on to keep the heat and moisture in the tray.
  • Put these planted cubes into the grow tray and add water or the half strength nutrient solution as the level goes down in the grow tray.
  • After about four days, you’ll start to see some sprouts emerging.

Some people prefer to use a Ziploc bag, rather than a grow tray, when trying to get the seeds to germinate as it functions like a greenhouse. Seal the bag with a little bit of air and put it in a dark place for about four days to get the seeds sprouted. Then, you can put the starter cubes with sprouted seeds into the grow tray.

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Step by Step Instructions on Transplanting

Keep your tiny seedlings growing strong with your hydroponic nutrient solution. Once they’ve gotten bigger, you don’t have to make the nutrient solution half strength.

You’ll start to see the seedlings’ roots coming out of the bottom of the cube, and this is the sign you’ve been waiting for, as it means you can start transplanting. This can take about two to four weeks depending on what plants you’re growing.

Clear up a spot in your hydroponic system’s growing media for the seedling – cube and all. Gently transfer the starter cube into your growing media, and cover it gently.

Give the root system a chance to naturally seek out the water and nutrients in your system by top watering it for a few days to give it a chance to grow the root system.

Voila! You grew your own seedlings into a strong plant for your hydroponic system. Depending on the type of plant, you’ll be able to get your first harvest about four to eight weeks from the time you transplanted your seedlings.

Cut out the dependency of only being able to grow the types of plants that are available as seedlings at your favorite gardening store. Take a little extra time to nurture your seeds so that they become strong seedlings ready to transplant into your system. You’ll be able to take pride in your efforts with how healthy your plants are and your overall system’s health.

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The best cannabis seeds for hydroponics growing

However, it’s only recently that more cannabis growers are switching from soil to hydroponics setups. While these soilless methods aren’t super forgiving, they have the potential to produce bigger yields in a shorter time.

Since hydroponics requires a steeper learning curve, new cultivators must carefully consider which strain to grow before experimenting with this growing method. Starting with the right hybrid could save you a lot of headaches as you’re growing your herbs hydroponically.

What are the best cannabis seeds for hydroponics?

Since hydroponics systems aren’t as forgiving as soil, it’s best to start with strains that have solid genetics. While there’s no particular hybrid that’s perfect for hydroponics, beginner-friendly cultivars tend to work well in these units.

In general, when shopping for hydroponics cannabis seeds, look for strains that have a relatively low difficulty. This simple strategy should increase your odds of success.

Northern Lights

  • Often categorized as indica
  • Height: 3.5 – 5 feet
  • Time: 8 – 9 weeks

Blue Dream

  • Often categorized as hybrid
  • Height: 6.5 – 8 feet
  • Time: 8 – 9 weeks

White Widow Autoflower

  • Often categorized as hybrid
  • Height: ~ 2 feet
  • Time: 8 – 9 weeks

Gorilla Glue #4

  • Often categorized as hybrid
  • Height: 5 – 6 feet
  • Time: 9 weeks

Here’s a more in-depth look at the best cannabis seeds for hydroponics and what makes them unique.

Northern Lights

  • Autoflower: No
  • Often categorized as indica
  • Feminized
  • THC: 22%
  • CBG: 1%
  • Height: 3.5 – 5 feet
  • Time: 8 – 9 weeks
  • Caryophyllene, humulene , limonene, terpinolene

Northern Lights is every insomniac’s favorite indica. Not only is this earthy strain celebrated amongst medical cannabis patients, it’s an excellent choice for new cultivators.

Since Northern Lights is considered a full indica variety, it’s quite sturdy and doesn’t grow super tall. Within about 8 – 9 weeks, you should be ready to harvest these dense nugs from your hydroponic unit.

Blue Dream

  • Autoflower: No
  • Often categorized as hybrid
  • Feminized
  • THC: 19.2%
  • CBD: 0.1%
  • Height: 6.5 – 8 feet
  • Time: 8 – 9 weeks
  • Terpenes: Myrcene, beta-caryophyllene, and alpha-pinene

Blue Dream isn’t just a “dream” to toke; it’s pretty easy to cultivate. Indeed, a significant reason this Haze hybrid spread so rapidly has to do with its strong genetics.

As long as you’re comfortable with basic cannabis cultivation, it’s not too challenging to grow Blue Dream in a hydroponics unit. After about 8 – 9 weeks of cultivation, you’ll be rewarded with sweet, colorful nugs that have incredibly well-balanced effects.

The only downside of growing Blue Dream indoors is that it can get pretty tall. Ideally, you should know training techniques like LST to keep Blue Dream’s buds in check.

White Widow Autoflower

  • Autoflower: Yes
  • Often categorized as hybrid
  • Feminized
  • THC: 19%
  • CBD: ≤ 1%
  • Height: ~ 2 feet
  • Time: 8 – 9 weeks
  • Terpenes: Limonene, terpinolene, and beta-pinene

The original White Widow cultivar isn’t too tricky to grow, but using the autoflowering variety in a hydroponics unit is even easier. Since these strains flower without a change in light schedule, they don’t require as much skill as regular cannabis strains.

If you’re new to hydroponics, it’s best to go with well-reviewed auto strains like White Widow. Sure, the final result may not be as intense as the original, but this White Widow has plenty of pungency and head buzz effects. Plus, there’s a greater chance Auto White Widow will absorb a few minor mistakes.

Gorilla Glue #4

  • Autoflower: No
  • Often categorized as hybrid
  • Feminized
  • THC: 21.3%
  • CBG: 0.5%
  • Height: 5 – 6 feet
  • Time: 9 weeks
  • Terpenes: Beta-caryophyllene, limonene, and myrcene

Gorilla Glue #4 is one of a few award-winning strains that seem to perform better in hydroponics units. Arguably, this mainly has to do with GG4’s higher-than-average watering requirements.

Since hydroponics plants have direct access to water, there’s less risk of under or overwatering this flower. This easier access to water may also reduce GG4’s heightened risk for hermaphroditism.

Anyone who loves sedative indica hybrids with diesel and chocolate aromatics should add GG4 to their hydroponics plan.

What is growing marijuana in hydroponics?

The term hydroponic refers to cultivating plants without soil and literally means “water-working” coming from the Greek words “hydro” meaning water and “ponos” meaning labor. 3

There are many different hydroponics setups on the market, but none rely on soil as a grow medium. Instead, these systems use water, air bubbles, and store-bought nutrients to supply the cannabis plant’s roots with everything they need.

Some hydroponics systems also use pH-corrected inert mediums to stabilize roots. A few of the most commonly used inert products include clay pebbles, coco coir, and Rockwool. 4

Since the roots in hydroponics systems are exposed, they can absorb nutrients faster. On the positive side, this means plants will grow more quickly as they don’t have soil as a buffer. However, this lack of “buffer space” means there’s less room for error. 5

Here’s an overview of the most popular hydroponics systems for cannabis:

  • Deep water culture: plant roots touch stagnant water in a bucket with an airstone for oxygen.
  • Ebb and flow: water and nutrients from a reservoir push through containers with cannabis at pre-set intervals.
  • Drip irrigation: nutrient-rich water “drips” into cannabis plants’ roots, which are suspended in containers with inert materials.
  • Aeroponics: cannabis strains sit in chambers where they get sprayed with nutrient-rich mist at regular intervals.

How do you grow cannabis hydroponically?

Growing cannabis hydroponically is similar to using soil, but it requires more diligence on the part of the grower.

No matter which hydroponic system you use, it won’t hide mistakes as well as soil. Hydroponics growers have to be extra careful about factors like pH level, temperature, and nutrient feeding to ensure their girls grow nice and healthy. 6

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Generally, hydroponics growers need to maintain a slightly acidic pH in the water at around 5.5 – 5.8. It’s also imperative for ambient temperature to remain between 73° F – 83° F and water temp to be at ~ 68° F. 7

Speaking of water, you’ll need to monitor the water for signs of algae. This is especially true if you’re using Deep Water Culture, since water in this system doesn’t constantly circulate. 8

When using hydroponics, it’s important to invest in macro and micronutrients for your flowers. Since plants can’t absorb as many nutrients from plain water, you’re going to have to add more to your reservoir at regular intervals.

Just be sure to avoid the temptation to overfeed your plants. Yes, hydroponics units need more nutrients, but it’s still better to underfeed rather than risk “nutrient burn.”

Do you need special cannabis seeds for hydroponics?

Some strains may perform better in hydroponics units, but there aren’t “special seeds” for hydroponics. You could grow any cannabis strain you like in any hydroponics setup.

The key determinant for success is your comfort in growing a chosen cannabis strain. If you have a lot of experience with a particular hybrid, chances are you’ll have an easier time adjusting to a new hydroponics system.

Should you grow cannabis with soil or hydroponics?

There are endless debates over the benefits and drawbacks of soil versus hydroponics. However, most cultivators agree that hydroponics has a higher learning curve. So, if you’re new to cultivating cannabis, it’s probably best to master your favorite strains in soil before dabbling with hydroponics.

While hydroponics usually rewards growers with faster and bigger yields, they require more attention to detail. Also, hydroponics are traditionally more expensive to maintain versus a DIY soil grow.

Of course, this doesn’t mean you can’t go straight into hydroponics if you want to take advantage of faster growing times. Just be sure to constantly monitor your grow room’s specs for a successful experience.

Is it worth the trouble to grow hydroponics cannabis seeds?

Hydroponics isn’t as simple as soil growing, but it’s the better option for indoor growers who want a greater ROI. Also, “control freak” cultivators often prefer adjusting variables like nutrients in hydroponics versus soil. If you’re interested in getting the biggest cannabis yields, it pays to learn more about hydroponics growing. While you could still get excellent yields with soil, hydroponics will always reward growers with the fastest and fattest flowers.

How to Grow Cannabis Seeds Hydroponically

How To Grow Cannabis Seeds Hydroponically – Hydroponic cultivation is a promising solution to many challenges of crop production. It fixes the need for arable land, deforestation, ecosystem degradation, climate changes, and other issues related to cannabis cultivation. For decades, hydroponics has proven its effectiveness in various settings, and cannabis farming is no exception.

What Is Hydroponic Cultivation?

Hydroponics is a method of cultivating plants without soil by using mineral nutrient solutions in an aqueous solvent. In hydroponic cannabis cultivation, farmers plant their seeds in inert growing media and then supply them with nutrient-rich solutions like oxygen and water. To ensure that the plants remain healthy, farmers must control the whole environment, including nutrition, lighting, temperature, humidity, and oxygen. This system encourages rapid growth, high yields, and top-quality cannabis.

How to Grow Cannabis Seeds Hydroponically

To achieve successful results in hydroponic farming, cannabis growers must become acquainted with every component that ensures a smooth and efficient hydroponic grow. This includes selecting a grow medium, hydroponic system, lighting, nutrients, and more.

Choosing a Hydroponic Growing Medium

The first step to growing cannabis seeds hydroponically is to choose a growing medium. The medium allows roots to access nutrients in the water easily. There is an array of growing media to consider, but the right medium depends on which hydroponic system you will be using. Some of the most popular media include:

Clay pebbles

Clay pebbles, also known as hydroton, are great at aerating cannabis root zones. These particles have large pore spaces, allowing the nutrient solutions to flow through the medium easily. Their large pore size also reduces the chance of blockages within the hydroponic system. Clay pebbles are set up by simply placing them in the container and creating gaps for easy root penetration into the water.

Clay pebbles are a popular choice for small-scale growers; however, this type of medium might be too costly for larger operations. Another drawback is that farmers sometimes need to adjust the pH of the medium to provide an optimal growing environment.

Rockwool

Made using basalt rock and recycled slag, Rockwool is a type of mineral wool that is a popular medium for cannabis cultivation. Rockwool is excellent for water retention, allowing for adequate hydration of the upper root system. This medium also provides exceptional drainage, preventing the plants from becoming overwatered. Although Rockwool is a popular medium that offers many benefits, it is not environmentally friendly and requires pH adjustment for optimal plant growth.

Perlite

Perlite is a volcanic glass that expands when exposed to high temperatures. This medium is affordable and easy to use, making it a popular choice for hydroponic and soil growers alike. Perlite provides adequate aeration and prevents compaction in garden soil as well as hydroponics.

This medium does not degrade or decompose and can be reused multiple times before it starts to break into smaller pebbles. Perlite has a neutral pH and will take on the pH of the nutrient solution it is submerged in, making it easy for growers to regulate the acidity or alkalinity of their media.

Coco Coir

Coco coir is made from the hairy fiber on the outer shell of coconuts. This type of medium allows for proper aeration and moisture retention in hydroponic systems. It also protects roots from the harsh effects of plant-stimulating hormones. Coco coir is environmentally friendly, has a neutral pH, is reusable, and does not allow for the growth of fungi.

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Choosing a Hydroponic Growing System

Most hydroponic systems are similar in their use of nutrient-rich water solutions; however, they differ depending on the material used, setup, water exposure, and circulation. Still, farmers can go for DIY systems using buckets, pumps, drills, and air stones. The best hydroponic systems to consider are:

Deep Water Culture (DWC)

Deepwater culture is a cheap and easy way for beginners to grow cannabis seeds hydroponically. To set up a DWC system, growers simply place their plants in buckets filled with nutrient-rich solutions and use air pumps to supply oxygen to the roots.

Because this system does not use a growing medium, it prevents pests from proliferating around the root zone. DWC systems are fully automated and require little maintenance to use, making them ideal for inexperienced growers or those with large-scale operations.

Ebb and Flow

This system consists of buckets hung over a growing tray with inlet and outlet waterways, both of which connect to an external tank. The tank periodically supplies the plants with fresh water that is rich in nutrients and oxygen. The system has a water pump and a timer to control the water cycle to and from the external tank and growing tray. Ebb and flow systems are ideal for beginners as these systems are highly effective, easy to use, and require minimal maintenance.

Nutrient Film Technique (NFT)

With the nutrient film technique, plants absorb nutrients and oxygen from a solution that flows through growing trays. The tube that circulates the solution is tilted slightly to allow the water to flow from one side of the reservoir to the other. With this system, crops receive a constant flow of nutrients and oxygen. Growers can conserve water and nutrients by using the nutrient film technique because the nutrient solution is constantly being recirculated.

Drip System

A drip system is a type of irrigation method that slowly drips nutrients and water into the roots of the cannabis plants. This system consists of a large tray with a growing medium such as clay pebbles or perlite. Cannabis plants access the constantly flowing solution through individual pipes, and the excess solution drips down the growing medium and back into the reservoir. Because drip systems slowly release water to the plants, it reduces the amount of water lost due to evaporation. This system is also very energy efficient, as it does not require a great deal of pressure from a powerful pump.

Wick System

Much like drip systems, wick systems use growing trays that are filled with clay pebbles. A water tank rests underneath the tray from which several wicks connect to the medium. The solution travels down the wicks, passively hydrating the roots of the plants. This type of system is entirely passive and does not require any pumps or air stones. Wick systems allow the plants to access only as much water as they need, meaning that growers need not worry about overwatering their crops.

Aeroponics

In aeroponic systems, plants are suspended inside of a chamber, and their roots are misted with water. Aeroponic systems are often used to start clones but can also be used throughout the entire growth cycle. This type of system may not be ideal for inexperienced growers, as it takes some expertise to set up and maintain. This system also makes it easy for pests and diseases to take hold in the garden.

Choosing Lighting

In the past, most farmers preferred to use high-intensity discharge lights (HIDs) such as high-pressure sodium (HPS) or metal halide (MH) lights. But the recent full spectrum light-emitting diode (LED) grow lights have had tremendous success.

MH lights are close to natural lighting and are abundant in blue and green spectrums, which are best for vegetative growth. HPS offers orange, amber, and red-light spectrums, which are best for later cannabis flowering stages. Farmers often use metal halide lights during the vegetative growth period and switch to high-pressure sodium lights during the flowering period.

Although HID lamps provide an excellent light source for plant growth, they waste lots of energy and produce excessive heat. To mitigate the heat, farmers should invest in robust ventilation systems, including can fans and oscillating fans.

Lately, many growers have started using full-spectrum LED lights, which are far more energy-efficient than HID ones. Moreover, they are perfect for all growing phases and don’t require a ballast to power them.

Because most strains of cannabis are photoperiod-dependent, farmers should carefully regulate the light cycle during the vegetative and flowering stages. This is a crucial step in growing cannabis seeds hydroponically.

Nutrients

Like other crops, cannabis requires an abundance of major nutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Additionally, it requires smaller amounts of other nutrients such as boron, sulfur, calcium, magnesium. The best way to feed cannabis plants is to use hydroponic nutrient solutions containing all the required nutrients for the vegetation and flowering periods.

Best Cannabis Seeds

Greenpoint Seeds offers superior cannabis seeds that produce potent plants in any hydroponic growing system, regardless of your growing season or environment. We pride ourselves in providing the best feminized and regular cannabis seeds on the market.

Contact us for more information about how to grow cannabis seeds hydroponically. Have you ever tried hydroponics? Share your story in the comment section below.

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2 thoughts on “ How to Grow Cannabis Seeds Hydroponically ”

I use general hydro nutrients and have found that because the ppm of my water is below 50 I have to add small amounts of vsma and so to get the best results in my deep water system. A ppm meter is very important to a hydro system.

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